In Honor of Juneteenth 2020

The history of the Community Action movement is rooted in the belief that the experience of poverty is of fundamental concern to all Americans, that we are all directly and indirectly impacted by the existence of poverty, and only when our most marginalized community members thrive can we all thrive. The persistent existence of poverty is morally and ethically wrong, and for 44 years the Community Action Partnership of North Dakota has worked tirelessly within our communities to support struggling families work to achieve economic independence.

We know that despite our efforts, Black, brown, and Indigenous people in North Dakota make up a disproportionate amount of those experiencing low levels of social and economic well-being. This means that across the state our Black, brown, and Indigenous community members are more likely to live in poverty, experience economic insecurity, and that this reality impacts the wellbeing of us all.

With the killing of George Floyd a few weeks ago while in police custody, racial inequities and the resulting social and economic injustices can no longer be decentralized in our efforts to eradicate poverty. We must make the connection between systemic racism and persistent poverty and recognize that as long as one of these systems remains embedded in America, we will not be able to fully eradicate either experience.

Racism, whether individual, institutional, or systemic, is of fundamental concern to all Americans. We are all directly and indirectly impacted by the existence of racism. The persistent existence of racism is morally and ethically wrong. Only when our most marginalized community members are free from racism can we all thrive.

Today, on Juneteenth, we are especially reminded of the historical implications of our words versus our actions. The signing of the Emancipation Proclamation formally ordered that enslaved people were to be freed. However, it was not until two-and-a-half years later, June 19th, 1865, that the news finally reached Galveston, Texas and the remaining enslaved people were freed. This disparate experience of freedom and justice continues today through enduring racial inequities.

We at CAPND know that inequity and injustice will continue until our actions match our words. We are committed to establishing more meaningful working relationships with those representing and advocating on behalf of our Black, brown, and Indigenous community members to further embed racial justice in our work. Within our own organization, we commit to training staff, board members and volunteers on the pervasive issues of racial discrimination, like implicit bias and white privilege, which directly impacts our day-to-day work of eliminating poverty.

There is no peace without justice and accountability. It is not enough to condemn racism. We must be actively anti-racist in all our pursuits. With the support of North Dakotan’s moved by the tragedy of George Floyd’s unnecessary death, the National Community Action Partnership, and CAP agencies across the country, we will continue helping people help themselves and each other.

- Community Action Partnership of North Dakota


The Promise of Community Action

Community Action changes people's lives, embodies the spirit of hope, improves communities, and makes America a better place to live. We care about the entire community and we are dedicated to helping people help themselves and each other.

 


About Community Action

Community Action Agencies (CAAs) are nonprofits originally established under the Economic Opportunity Act of 1964 to fight America's War on Poverty. Today, North Dakota has seven CAAs on the front-lines of the battle. These seven agencies provide essential services to every region and all 53 counties of the state.

CAAs enable low-income people of all ages to secure the opportunities they need to obtain and maintain economic security.

October is National Fair Trade Month!

October is National Fair Trade Month!

Tomorrow marks the first day of October, a month in which we celebrate and raise awareness about the fair-trade movement and its effect on our global economy. 

What is fair trade, you ask? According to the World Fair Trade Organization, it’s “a trading partnership, based on dialogue, transparency and respect, that seeks greater equity in international trade.” The fair-trade movement promotes proper wages, inclusive practices, and 
safe working conditions for employees. 

Many communities who produce fair-trade products are often in need. There are plenty of ways in which you can support fair-trade producers and organizations. The following list should give you some inspiration on how to incorporate the fair-trade movement into your life.

1. Purchase fair-trade products.
Look for a fair-trade symbol, like the one pictured here, when shopping for ethically sourced products. You can find fair-trade versions of just about everything you buy: clothing, home decor, kids’ toys, etc. Encourage your friends and family to join you in your fair-trade journey as well.

2. Shop for fair-trade groceries.
So many of your kitchen staples can found in fair-trade versions. From coffee to produce to herbs and spices, you’ll be sure to snag some great finds. If your local grocery store doesn’t stock a fair-trade product you’re looking for, be sure to ask an employee if they’d consider carrying it. Buying fair-trade groceries supports farmers and allows them to keep producing food that’s good for you and the global economy.

3. Spread the word about fair trade.
You know the phrase, “spread like wildfire?” Well, the fair-trade movement can’t grow unless people like you tell others about it. Use hashtags like #FairTradeMonth or #FindFairTrade on your social media posts. Talk about fair trade and its benefits to your friends, family and coworkers. Word-of-mouth is an incredibly powerful tool, and you can use to help continue a movement that’s changing the world for the better.

4. Donate to places that support fair trade.
By giving what you can to organizations that support fair trade, you’re helping strengthen the communities it impacts. A cacao farmer in Ecuador gets to keep making a living wage because of people like you who donate. Giving back to fair-trade nonprofits helps communities rise above the poverty line.

Fair trade is a wonderful cause to support. By dedicating a whole month to raise awareness for it, you can make a big impact. Try any of these ideas to get started being a champion for the fair-trade movement.

  • National CAP
  • National Community Action Foundation
  • NASCSP
    NASCSP
  • Community Action Program Legal Services